Raw Voilà Recipe: Turmeric Teaser

Turmeric aids in detoxifying the liver, boosts overall immunity, is anti-bacterial, anti-fungal, anti-inflammatory and may also help stave off cancer. Belonging to the ginger family, its beautiful earthy and slightly citrusy, peppery flavor pairs well with countless types of recipes. I love adding fresh turmeric to various homemade juice concoctions. Plus, its golden hue is just gorgeous!

‘Turmeric Teaser’

A wonderfully immune-boosting, detoxifying blend.

1-inch by 2-inch piece of fresh turmeric root (skin left on)
3 medium ripe Red Delicious apples, cored and quartered (skin left on)
1/2 of 1 medium Garden cucumber, cut into spears (skin left on)

Process all of the ingredients through a juicer of your choice. Stir gently and serve!


A few tips…

To help limit your exposure to harmful pesticide residues and waxed coatings often associated with conventional produce, try to purchase organically grown fruits and vegetables as often as possible.

The listed ingredients should roughly amount to 24 ounces of juice, depending on how much liquid your turmeric root piece, apples and cucumber yield. It is best to serve fresh juices soon after they are made due to oxidation and degrading of nutrients. However, they can be tightly sealed and placed inside of the refrigerator for short-term storage (a day or two).

While the final outcome will somewhat vary each time a juice is made, produce size (as well as quality) does play an important part. In the list of ingredients, I noted 3 medium Red Delicious apples, cored and quartered (skin left on). A medium Red Delicious apple would equate to an apple at least 2 and 1/2 inches in width and 2 and 1/2 inches in height. 1/2 of 1 medium Garden cucubmer, cut into spears (skin left on): A medium Garden cucumber would equate to a cucumber at least 2 inches in width and 5 inches in length.

Save the leftover pulp for adding to soups or as an ingredient in making breads or crackers. No need to throw that extra goodness away! The leftover pulp can last a day or two if stored in a tightly sealed container and kept inside of the refrigerator. If you are not able to use the leftover pulp in that amount of time, storing it inside of the freezer may be a better option.

Raw Voilà Recipe: Cucumber Cooler

Cucumbers are excellent for body hydration and overall skin health, and are also wonderful for flushing toxins from the body. Pineapples are high in bromelain which greatly helps with digestion. Cilantro is excellent for aiding the body in removing heavy metals. I love adding ginger root to many of my juices, not only for its anti-inflammatory properties but also because it’s greatly immune boosting. Lemon peel purifies the blood vessels, detoxifies the skin, helps lower cholesterol, and has components that fight cancer. A powerful combination!

‘Cucumber Cooler’

Revitalizing blend rich in antioxidants, perfect for a hot Summer day.

half of 1 large Garden cucumber, cut into spears (skin left on)
half of 1 medium to large pineapple, peeled, core left intact
half of 1 small lemon (peel left on)
1/3 cup cilantro, stems left intact, tightly packed
1 large Golden Delicious apple, cored and quartered (skin left on)
1-inch piece of fresh ginger root (skin left on)

Process all of the ingredients through a juicer of your choice. Stir gently and serve!


A few tips…

To help limit your exposure to harmful pesticide residues and waxed coatings often associated with conventional produce, try to purchase organically grown fruits and vegetables as often as possible.

The listed ingredients should roughly amount to 16 ounces of juice, depending on how much liquid your cucumber, pineapple, lemon, cilantro, apple and ginger root piece yield. It is best to serve fresh juices soon after they are made due to oxidation and degrading of nutrients. However, they can be tightly sealed and placed inside of the refrigerator for short-term storage (a day or two).

While the final outcome will somewhat vary each time a juice is made, produce size (as well as quality) does play an important part. In the list of ingredients, I noted half of 1 large Garden cucumber, cut into spears (skin left on). A large Garden cucumber would equate to a cucumber at least 2 inches in width and 8 inches in length. Half of 1 medium to large pineapple, peeled, core left intact: Pineapple types vary as does their size. An average-sized pineapple would equate to at least 5 inches in width and 7 inches in height (excluding the green top). Half of 1 small lemon (peel left on): A small lemon would equate to at least 2 inches in width and 2 inches in height. 1 large Golden Delicious apple, cored and quartered (skin left on): A large Golden Delicious apple would equate to an apple at least 3 inches in width and 3 inches in height.

Save the leftover pulp for adding to soups or as an ingredient in making breads or crackers. No need to throw that extra goodness away! The leftover pulp can last a day or two if stored in a tightly sealed container and kept inside of the refrigerator. If you are not able to use the leftover pulp in that amount of time, storing it inside of the freezer may be a better option.

Raw Voilà Recipe: Almond Milk

Almonds are an excellent source of vitamin E, magnesium and phosphorus as well as heart healthy monounsaturated fats. Though referred to as a nut, they are botanically characterized as a fruit, and are a cousin of the apricot, cherry, nectarine, peach and plum. Almond is just one of several types of plant-based milk that I enjoy. I have an affinity for Brazil Nut Milk, though I also like pumpkin seed and hemp seed. There is also hazelnut, cashew, pecan and sunflower seed among others, not to mention the various blends that can be created—all of which are wonderful additions to smoothies, soups, puddings, dressings, sauces and so much more.

‘Almond Milk’

Creamy, simple and versatile.

3 cups pure water
1 cup raw almonds, soaked and sprouted (preferably one full day)
1/2 of one very large date, pitted
1/16 teaspoon pink crystal salt (fine grind)

Using a high-speed blender, first blend together the almonds and water until creamy. With either a tightly woven cheesecloth or a fine-mesh sieve, separate the almond pulp from the liquid and pour the milk back into the blender. Add the pitted date and salt and process until the date has been completely broken down. Separate the date fiber from the liquid and pour the almond milk into your choice of airtight container. The finished milk should be stored in the refrigerator and used within 3 to 5 days.


A few tips…

Double or triple the recipe as needed.

The almonds were measured after soaking.

In general, soaking nuts allows for greater availability of nutrients and less impact on digestion. Since almonds are fairly hard and have a pretty tough skin, I prefer to soak them for one full day (24 hours).

After one day of soaking, the almonds should sprout. If so, there will be a tiny white nub on the tip of each almond. While the ‘nub’ will not grow into a visible long tail, it does grow inward and qualifies as a ‘sprouted almond’.

Depending on the type of blender you have, the exact length of time needed to process the almonds will vary. When you first begin the blending process, the almonds will cause loud rattling, and as they become pulverized the rattling will lessen. It may take a bit of trial and error to gauge how smooth the pulp should be. If the almonds process for too long, the pulp will be superfine and require more time and effort to strain. However, if the almonds do not process long enough, the milk could end up watery instead of creamy. After you have made Almond Milk a few times, you will get the hang of it.

This milk is meant to be mildly sweet. In the list of ingredients, I noted 1/2 of one very large date, pitted. 1/2 of one very large date is equal to about 1/2 of one tablespoon. I chose to freely list the date to make it easier, but you can go with the 1/2 tablespoon measurement if you prefer.

If your dates are not soft and pliable, you can soak them in a small amount pure water, just enough to cover the dates, for fifteen minutes or longer until they plump up enough for ease in blending. If you store your dates in the refrigerator, they will become stiff from the cold but will usually somewhat soften up after being left out at room temperature for a while. If they still seem hard, then definitely utilize the soak method.

To ensure a silky texture that I prefer when making nut (and seed) milk, I use a tightly woven cheesecloth to separate the almond milk from the nut pulp as well as the date fiber. However, a fine-mesh sieve is also a good option.

You may notice the separation of nut fat from the water. Not to worry, that is completely normal. Just give the almond milk a gentle shake before you use it.

While it would certainly be easier to blend all of the ingredients in one go instead of through a two-step process, I prefer the latter as a plain, unseasoned nut (or seed) milk pulp is much more versatile and consistent.

The leftover almond milk pulp can be either used immediately or reserved for later. If you are not able to utilize the almond milk pulp right away, you have a few choices as to how to store it for future use. It can be stored in an airtight container and kept inside of the refrigerator for one to two days, or it can be kept inside of the freezer and thawed when needed. For long-term storage, the leftover almond milk pulp can be dehydrated until completely dry, ground into a fine flour, stored in an airtight container and kept inside of the refrigerator.

Use the leftover almond milk pulp for making breads, crackers, cookies, burgers, wrap fillings, etc. Using the pulp instead of ground whole nuts lends a wonderfully light texture to your creations.